Sheldrick Redwine Jersey

The Browns on Saturday selected Miami safety Sheldrick Redwine with the No. 119 pick in the

fourth round of the 2019 NFL Draft.

Redwine is the Browns’ third selection in the draft and the third on the defensive side of

the ball, following LSU CB Greedy Williams (No. 46) and BYU LB Sione Takitaki (No. 80).

“The game is a coverage game. You have to have physicality, but you also have to be able

to have guys that can cover,” Browns Director of College Scouting Steve Malin said. “We

feel like he gives us the flexibility to do that stuff. He has a physical presence but also

he has good ball skills and can play in coverage for us.”

Redwine, who also grew up in Miami, was a two-year starter for the Hurricanes and shined as

a senior. He earned All-ACC honorable mention after compiling 64 total tackles, 3.5 tackles

for loss, three sacks, three interceptions, one fumble recovery and one forced fumble.

Redwine had 59 tackles and two interceptions as a junior.

Even as the Hurricanes as a whole struggled last fall, one group starred.

With veterans Sheldrick Redwine, Michael Jackson and Jaquan Johnson in the secondary, no

team in the country did a better job against the pass than Miami, which held opponents to

an average of 135.6 yards through the air per game.

And personnel from across the NFL took notice.

All three of Miami’s veteran defensive backs heard their names called during the final day

of the NFL draft, with Redwine being the first when he was taken in the fourth round by the

Cleveland Browns with the 119th pick.

His selection was followed by Jackson being drafted by the Dallas CCLEVELAND, Ohio — The Browns are trying to re-create the Dawgs on defense, and Miami safety Sheldrick Redwine, drafted with the No. 119 pick in the fourth-round, has the requisite bark.

“You’re looking for dogs,” Browns director of college scouting Steve Malin said Saturday shortly after the pick. “You’re looking for alphas on defense. We’re trying to build a championship team. It takes a special person to get you over the hump.’

A converted cornerback, Redwine (6-0, 196) played free safety at Miami, but can also play strong and will likely challenge free-agent pickup Morgan Burnett for time at strong safety.

“He can play free, strong and nickel,” said Malin.

He was the first of five selections the Browns have on the third and final day of the draft, and the team’s third straight defensive selection. With their first pick, they traded up from No. 49 to No. 46 with the Colts to select LSU cornerback Greedy Williams, surrendering their No. 144 overall pick in the fifth round. That pick was acquired from the Jaguars for running back Carlos Hyde.

The Browns came back in the third round and tabbed Brigham Young linebacker Sione Takitaki at No. 80. Takitaki plays with a violence that the Browns are seeking at the position, and he’s versatile enough to play all three spots, sam, mike and will.

With Williams and Redwine joining Damarious Randall, Denzel Ward, Terrence Mitchell and T.J. Carrie in the defensive backfield, the new Browns might rival the Top Dawgs of the late 1980s.

“We’re excited to add (Redwine) to the organization,” Malin said Saturday shortly after the pick. “He was a corner, converted over to safety, so he can cover. He gives you flexibility to play high or low.”

He said Redwine (6-0, 196), the 13th safety off the board, will also contribute on special teams. The Browns liked several other safeties in this draft, including Juan Thornhill, who went No. 31 overall to the Chiefs.

“This is where you make your roster,” Malin said. “We want to be a championship-caliber football team.”

Redwine had a standout senior season at Miami, starting all 13 games and ranking among Miami’s top defensive starters. En route to All-ACC Honorable mention recognition, he had 64 tackles, 3.5 for a loss, three sacks, three interceptions, one fumble recovery and one forced fumble last year. The three interceptions tied for the team lead and the tackles ranked sixth.

Here’s the scouting report from NFLdraftscout.com’s Ric Serritella, who ranked Redwine as the 10th-best safety in the class in his draft guide:

PROS: Well-built defensive back with broad shoulders, long arms (32 3/8″) and a tapered middle with light feet. Lined up all over the field for Miami, showing the size, agility and awareness to play a similar role in the NFL. Good balance and burst out of his backpedal when lined up in man to man, showing the ability to explode forward to challenge underneath routes. Efficient transition out of his backpedal to run vertically, showing good speed for the position. Keeps his eyes trained on the quarterback and shows good spatial awareness of what’s happening around him, dropping his primary assignment when the ball leaves the quarterback’s hand. Good timing and body control to make the extended interception, using his length and soft hands to high point passes (Virginia).

More of a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none type than a true moveable chess piece. Read and react player who is too often caught flat-footed watching and waiting before attacking. Runs a bit hot and cold as a tackler. Sporadic strike zone, bouncing off some ballcarriers with heavy collisions or swiping at the legs of ballcarriers and failing to wrap his arms.

Redwine excelled on the nation’s No. 4 overall defense and No. 1 pass defense at “The U.” He has the speed Browns GM John Dorsey loves, clocking a 4.44 at the combine, sixth-best among safeties and 10th best among all defensive backs. He also posted a 39-inch vertical, fourth-best among safeties.

“I’m a competitor,” Redwine told the Miami Herald, adding that his versatility and football acumen make him valuable.

The safety, who got to wear the Miami turnover chain three times last season, became a fan favorite by scribbling messages to fans on the white board during games that were captured by TV cameras.

Once, he wrote, “Don’t become a fan later.”

NFL Network analyst Daniel Jeremiah described Redwine on a conference call as a “a real physical, sure tackler and excellent blitzer. You see him in the middle of the field some as well as over the slot.”

Sione Takitaki Jersey

Sione Takitaki went from being kicked off the BYU football team after his first season in Provo to being named team captain his last. Now the Cougars’ senior linebacker is headed to the NFL.

The Cleveland Browns selected Takitaki with the 17th pick of the third round of the NFL draft Friday night, No. 80 overall. The selection completed a remarkable rise for Takitaki, who was projected as a sixth- or seventh-round pick before he shined in a couple senior all-star games and put up impressive numbers at the NFL Scouting Combine in February.

Browns assistant general manager Eliot Wolf said the club was impressed by Takitaki’s off-the-field turnaround at BYU.

“He is a success story,” Wolf said in a conference call. “You talk to anyone there — they didn’t think he was going to make it his first year. He completely turned his life around.”

Added Wolf: “He is a violent tackler, and plays with a lot of versatility.”

Takitaki, 6-foot-1 and 238 pounds, grew up in Fontana, Calif., and was raised by a single mother. He was involved in a fight in the BYU dormitories before his freshman season, and was only allowed to stay on the team after then-coach Bronco Mendenhall let his teammates vote on the matter.

He would be suspended three more times before his junior season, but turned his life around with the help of his wife, Alyssa, a former BYU swimmer.

“I am very excited for Sione,” said BYU coach Kalani Sitake in a school news release. “He will fit perfectly with his talents in Cleveland with a really good coaching staff. Sione is a really versatile athlete and really took advantage of his experience playing three different positions for us. He will just continue to get better.”

Takitaki said he hadn’t talked to the Browns since the combine. He visited seven other franchises, and expected one of them to take him. But he was happy to go to Cleveland, despite it being one of the weaker teams in the league the past few decades.

He is the 17th BYU defender to be taken in one of the three opening rounds of the NFL draft, and 38th BYU player overall. Last year, fellow BYU linebacker Fred Warner went to the San Francisco 49ers in the third round.

Takitaki is the 15th BYU linebacker selected in the draft, joining the likes of Kyle Van Noy (second round), Rob Morris (first round) and Todd Shell (first round).

Provo • It cracks up former BYU linebacker Sione Takitaki when people ask him which team he would most like to play for in the NFL as the draft approaches this week in Nashville, Tenn.

That’s because when you have been on the “remarkable journey” that Takitaki says he has been on, you can’t afford to be picky.

“I would love to play for any team that likes me,” he says.

Takitaki’s troubles at BYU and subsequent turnaround, with the help of his wife Alyssa, have been well-documented. He doesn’t shy away from talking about “that part of my story,” but is also eager to add more chapters, including the realization of a boyhood dream to play in the NFL.

Like Bronson Kaufusi was in 2016, Jamaal Williams was in 2017 and fellow linebacker Fred Warner was last year, Takitaki might be only BYU player taken in the 2019 draft, which begins Thursday with the first round, followed by the second and third rounds on Friday and concluding with rounds 4-7 on Saturday.

Defensive end Corbin Kaufusi — Bronson’s brother — is also a draft possibility, although three surgeries after the season ended kept him out of the NFL Combine in Indianapolis and limited what he could do at BYU’s Pro Day. Running backs Squally Canada, Brayden El-Bakri and Matt Hadley, receiver Dylan Collie, defensive back Michael Shelton and quarterback Tanner Mangum are free-agent possibilities.

So draft weekend drama for BYU fans will center on Takitaki. In which round will he go, and to which team?

He hasn’t a clue, although the Los Angeles Rams, Los Angeles Chargers, Miami Dolphins, Tennessee Titans, Cincinnati Bengals and Kansas City Chiefs are among the teams seemingly most interested. Takitaki said he made seven visits the last month to cities that host NFL franchises, while two clubs came to Provo for private workouts outside of Pro Day.

Last week, he spent 40 minutes talking to the Philadelphia Eagles’ defensive coordinator via FaceTime and also visited the Houston Texans, according to the Houston Chronicle.

“I think I will be a steal,” Takitaki told KSL-TV. “People are expecting different things. I think I will go sooner than most people think. … Whichever team takes me, it will be a great day to get to that stage, get things going.”

That team will get one of the hardest workers in Kalani Sitake’s tenure in Provo, BYU’s head coach said.

Greedy Williams Jersey

BEREA, Ohio — After trading up three spots, the Cleveland Browns selected Andraez Williams with the No. 46 pick in the 2019 NFL Draft.

You, however, likely know the LSU cornerback by another name: Greedy.

In addition to being one of the top prospects in this year’s draft, Williams’ lays claim to one its best names, having universally been known as “Greedy” since bursting on the scene as a 4-star recruit in the 2016 class. Only the All-American cornerback’s nickname has nothing to do with his habit of picking off opposing passers, but rather, it was given to him long before his on-field ability had made itself apparent.

Speaking to reporters shortly after being drafted, Andraez told the story of how he became Greedy:

“I got the nickname Greedy from my aunt,” Williams revealed. “I was six-months-old, and I was chugging a lot of milk. She named me ‘Greedy Deedee,’ but they took the ‘Deedee’ off and just kept it ‘Greedy.’ I have been ‘Greedy’ ever since.”

Suffice to say, the name stuck — and for good reason.

In two seasons at LSU, the 6-foot-2, 185-pound Williams tallied 19 pass defenses and 8 interceptions. And although some of questioned his tackling ability — and cited it as a reason he slid into the second round — Browns general manager John Dorsey insisted the greedy part of his new cornerback’s game is ultimately what matters most.

“Corners are paid to cover,” Dorsey told reporters in Berea shortly after making his first selection of this year’s draft. “And then the tackling aspect — just get the guy down.”

After trading up three spots from its original position of No. 49, the Cleveland Browns selected LSU cornerback Greedy Williams in the second round (46th overall) of the 2019 NFL Draft.

As one might expect, it didn’t take long for social media to react to the Browns’ addition of the All-American cornerback, which marked Cleveland’s first selection of this year’s draft. And like most transactions since John Dorsey was hired as general manager, the reaction was overwhelmingly positive.

BATON ROUGE, La. — It would be so much more fitting if Greedy Williams had earned his nickname on the football field.

That’s where he gobbled up eight interceptions in two seasons to position himself as the latest first-round NFL draft talent to be churned out of LSU’s cornerback factory.

That’s also where he has an insatiable desire to be considered the best. When asked at the Tigers’ pro day if he believes he is the top cornerback in this year’s draft, Greedy replied with a big smile and an incredulous, “What?! What?!” before going into a speech about how the “stats don’t lie.”

And the football field is where Greedy has gone to work, hoping to use his talent to create a better life for his family — including his 2-year-old daughter, Khloe, and his mother, Lakesha Williams, a single parent who raised four kids in some of the roughest neighborhoods of Shreveport, Louisiana, before she wound up marrying Greedy’s youth football coach.

“Football changed my family’s life,” Greedy said.

The real story is that Andraez Williams became known as “Greedy” when he was 1 month old. That’s when Lakesha’s aunt started calling him “Greedy Deedy” because of the way he gulped through his full supply of bottles so quickly.

But it didn’t take long before he started living up to the hype that comes with a name like that. As his coach-turned-stepfather, Lonnie Bryant, likes to say, Greedy was a “shutdown corner” from the time he started playing football at the age of 5. Even though teams didn’t throw the ball much at that age, Bryant said they all liked to run wide around the edges. And none of them could get around Greedy.

“I knew his time would come, because he just wanted it. He wanted it badder than anybody,” said Greedy’s older brother, Rodarius, who plays cornerback at Oklahoma State. “From him being that hard worker and wanting to be greedy — he’s got the perfect name, because he never gave up on anything.”

Rodarius, who is one year older, naturally boasted that he always used to beat Greedy in everything from sports to video games, “you name it.” But he said that just led to Greedy nagging him with demands like, “Let’s try it again, let’s do it again. You can’t beat me this time. Play me again.”

“If you see that passion in his eyes the first time he touched a football, man it was amazing,” said Rodarius, who was nicknamed “LeeLee” growing up. “We watched him from the house because they practiced outside the house. When we just watched him run up and down the field, I’m like, ‘Is he really doing this?’ He was just running all over the young guys.”

Even more amazing was the way Greedy’s involvement with football wound up transforming the entire family.

Lakesha had her first daughter at age 14. And she doesn’t try to sugarcoat what life was like for her, Greedy, Rodarius and sisters Keandre and Andrea.

“Single mother, young mother, on assistance from the government, housing assistance. We were just going from — I guess I call it from one ‘hood to another ‘hood,” said Lakesha, who described Greedy’s biological father as being in and out of his life.

But Greedy’s passion for football and early success in the sport gave the family something to rally around. Rodarius started playing soon after, too.

Mar 28, 2019

Mike TriplettESPN Staff Writer 

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BATON ROUGE, La. — It would be so much more fitting if Greedy Williams had earned his nickname on the football field.

That’s where he gobbled up eight interceptions in two seasons to position himself as the latest first-round NFL draft talent to be churned out of LSU’s cornerback factory.
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That’s also where he has an insatiable desire to be considered the best. When asked at the Tigers’ pro day if he believes he is the top cornerback in this year’s draft, Greedy replied with a big smile and an incredulous, “What?! What?!” before going into a speech about how the “stats don’t lie.”

And the football field is where Greedy has gone to work, hoping to use his talent to create a better life for his family — including his 2-year-old daughter, Khloe, and his mother, Lakesha Williams, a single parent who raised four kids in some of the roughest neighborhoods of Shreveport, Louisiana, before she wound up marrying Greedy’s youth football coach.

“Football changed my family’s life,” Greedy said.

The real story is that Andraez Williams became known as “Greedy” when he was 1 month old. That’s when Lakesha’s aunt started calling him “Greedy Deedy” because of the way he gulped through his full supply of bottles so quickly.

But it didn’t take long before he started living up to the hype that comes with a name like that. As his coach-turned-stepfather, Lonnie Bryant, likes to say, Greedy was a “shutdown corner” from the time he started playing football at the age of 5. Even though teams didn’t throw the ball much at that age, Bryant said they all liked to run wide around the edges. And none of them could get around Greedy.

“I knew his time would come, because he just wanted it. He wanted it badder than anybody,” said Greedy’s older brother, Rodarius, who plays cornerback at Oklahoma State. “From him being that hard worker and wanting to be greedy — he’s got the perfect name, because he never gave up on anything.”
“Football changed my family’s life,” said Greedy Williams, a projected first-round pick in April’s draft. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Rodarius, who is one year older, naturally boasted that he always used to beat Greedy in everything from sports to video games, “you name it.” But he said that just led to Greedy nagging him with demands like, “Let’s try it again, let’s do it again. You can’t beat me this time. Play me again.”

“If you see that passion in his eyes the first time he touched a football, man it was amazing,” said Rodarius, who was nicknamed “LeeLee” growing up. “We watched him from the house because they practiced outside the house. When we just watched him run up and down the field, I’m like, ‘Is he really doing this?’ He was just running all over the young guys.”

Even more amazing was the way Greedy’s involvement with football wound up transforming the entire family.

Lakesha had her first daughter at age 14. And she doesn’t try to sugarcoat what life was like for her, Greedy, Rodarius and sisters Keandre and Andrea.

“Single mother, young mother, on assistance from the government, housing assistance. We were just going from — I guess I call it from one ‘hood to another ‘hood,” said Lakesha, who described Greedy’s biological father as being in and out of his life.

But Greedy’s passion for football and early success in the sport gave the family something to rally around. Rodarius started playing soon after, too.
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Top CB draft prospect Greedy Williams flashes confidence

Top CB draft prospect Greedy Williams showed off his confidence, among other skills, at LSU’s pro day Friday. When asked if he’s the best cornerback in the draft, Williams smiled and replied, “What?!” Video by Mike Triplett.

Then the biggest transformation came a few years later, when Lonnie became both a coach and father. “I call Lonnie our hero,” Lakesha said. “Because he matured me, let me see the bigger picture, there’s other things in life. We didn’t know what going out of town was until we met him. So we were taking trips and getting into sports, and I got to learn about sports and got more involved.

“Along with Greedy — I would say he’s the hero, too. Because he’d look at the kids practicing football and said he wanted to play football, too. And I’d say from then on it changed our lives.”

Not only did they move into a better neighborhood together, but the boys credit Lonnie for helping teach them how to be men — and to be fathers. (Rodarius is expecting his first daughter to be born this week.) Lonnie was also an anchor for the family when Lakesha battled cancer about 10 years ago. The rest of the family considers Lakesha a hero as well.

“She’s been all of our rock. I don’t know what I’d do without her … I think at that time they needed me — and I needed them. That slowed me down a little bit, because I became more of a family man,” said Lonnie, who runs the Xpress Sports youth programs in Shreveport, where he also coached fellow LSU first-round draft prospect Devin White as a basketball player on Greedy’s teams when they were in junior high.

“It’s still kind of crazy to me. I don’t even know how she did it, man,” Rodarius said. “Just from working at a hotel to taking care of four kids, day in and day out, making sure we had everything that we need. Man, she did a phenomenal job just staying on us and making sure we didn’t end up like other people we were surrounded with, where we grew up from.

“I’m just lost for words, man. I still don’t know how she did it.”

Greedy already bought his great grandmother her first set of new furniture recently, which touched Lakesha quite a bit. But he has even bigger plans for his mom once he gets his first signing bonus.

“That’s my motivation right there,” Greedy said. “Just watching my mom struggle to get to work, to take care of four kids on her own. Just watching things like that as a kid just makes you want to be in this position where I’m at to be able to just give her the world.

“Give her anything she wants, because she definitely deserves it, how hard she worked for us.”

As for Khloe, whose name is tattooed across the upper half of Greedy’s back, she can have “the whole [bank] account if she needs it.”

Greedy and White both have big plans to give back to the “318,” too, after they begin their promising NFL careers. The two of them have become close since they first met around age 12, each describing the other as a “brother.”

“I trust Greedy with my life, man,” White said. “If you cut him open, I might bleed. That’s how close we are together. I’d give him the clothes off my back.”

Greedy, who is the No. 25 overall prospect in the draft, according to Scouts Inc., still has some odds to overcome, however, if they’re both going to meet their goal of becoming top-10 picks.

Back in January, ESPN draft analysis Mel Kiper Jr. had Greedy projected as the No. 4 overall pick in his first mock draft, comparing the 6-foot-2, 185-pounder to Aqib Talib. But earlier this week, Kiper had him all the way down at No. 29 in his latest mock draft, explaining, “there are questions about his willingness to tackle and about his fluidity in coverage.”

Greedy, who was a second-team Associated Press All-American last season and a first-team selection by some other organizations, has heard questions about his tackling from NFL teams as well.

But his answer is that he wasn’t asked to tackle that much as a man-to-man corner in college.

“I’m not scared to tackle,” Greedy said. “Look, I’m coming with full force. You put me in a Cover 2 zone, you’ll see how I hit. Like I told the scouts, you put me in Cover 2 and that tight end runs in the zone, I’ll show you what I can do.”

Greedy said he’ll play wherever teams want him to line up. But he does consider man-to-man coverage his strength — as he displayed in a signature performance last season against Ole Miss receiver D.K. Metcalf, among others.

“Man-to-man, I can shut anybody down,” said Greedy, who described his bravado as “who I am.”

“A guy who can talk and back it up,” Greedy said. “I’ve got that confidence in me. If I say it, I’ve got to do it, I’ve got to prove it. So it’s been proven.”

Greedy’s 40-yard dash at the NFL scouting combine turned heads — he tied for second among all cornerbacks with a time of 4.37 seconds. His other drills at LSU’s pro day weren’t quite as elite, but he said he was happy with his performance.

No matter where he gets drafted next month, Greedy and the Williams family are already an inspiring success story. All four of Lakesha’s kids graduated high school, and three of them went to college — the kind of life she wanted for them when she wasn’t able to finish school.

And now a family that once didn’t “know what going out of town was” is planning to be together in Nashville, Tennessee, next month for the NFL draft.

“It doesn’t feel real, really,” Lakesha said. “I’m just happy, I really am. I’m happy for him most of all, because he worked so hard for it.

“He deserves every moment, every spotlight. Whatever it is, he deserves it.”